Author Archives: Jan Pešl

What FRC® actually is?

FRC® stands for Fast Response Command and it is the fastest network control, management and data collection across wireless networks.

A patented method how to send a command from the Coordinator to all or selected Nodes and receive responses including small data collected by individual Nodes in outstandingly short time.

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FRC is much faster (even by orders of magnitude) than polling individual Nodes one by one:

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See chapter FRC in IQMESH Network deployment technical guide.

Typical usage

Control

Fast sending a command to multiple Nodes and checking the results (e.g. an acknowledged broadcast).

Telemetry

Fast collecting of small data from multiple Nodes.

A new type of FRC®

Offline FRC is intended for Beaming sensors. It operates identically as common FRC but skips the individual phase within the FRC response.

Beaming

Beaming sensor is a Node device working in Offline mode (see just below), and communicating unidirectionally and asynchronously with Aggregating repeaters only.

An Aggregating repeater is a repeater providing not only a common routing but additionally concurrently serves as an interface to collect and forward data from Beaming sensors.

A Beaming sensor, once bonded, works in Offline mode. It is sleeping all the time and periodically or on some event asynchronously sends data to all Aggregating repeaters which are in direct RF range. Aggregating repeaters always store the last received data from every repeater into the log memory and automatically clear it after reading out. The data can be read out synchronously by the Coordinator using the Offline FRC. The Offline FRC is an analogy to the common FRC intended to read out common (non-Beaming) sensors. The data incoming to the Coordinator has the same format as from common (non-Beaming) sensors.

Local sensors work at the same RF channel as the entire IQMESH network which may cause unwanted interference. In some cases, an LBT (Listen Before Talk) check performed before the asynchronous packet is sent may help.

The Beaming sensors communicate unidirectionally and no confirmation is provided.

Data aggregating from Beaming sensors

Beaming sensor is a Node device working in Offline mode (see just below), and communicating unidirectionally and asynchronously with Aggregating repeaters only.

An Aggregating repeater is a repeater providing not only a common routing but additionally concurrently serves as an interface to collect and forward data from Beaming sensors.

A Beaming sensor, once bonded, works in Offline mode. It is sleeping all the time and periodically or on some event asynchronously sends data to all Aggregating repeaters which are in direct RF range. Aggregating repeaters always store the last received data from every repeater into the log memory and automatically clear it after reading out. The data can be read out synchronously by the Coordinator using the Offline FRC. The Offline FRC is an analogy to the common FRC intended to read out common (non-Beaming) sensors. The data incoming to the Coordinator has the same format as from common (non-Beaming) sensors.

Local sensors work at the same RF channel as the entire IQMESH network which may cause unwanted interference. In some cases, an LBT (Listen Before Talk) check performed before the asynchronous packet is sent may help.

The Beaming sensors communicate unidirectionally and no confirmation is provided. More on www.iqrf.org.

IQRF DALI Bridge – make obsolete lights smart

Are you interested in making your lights smart? You can now do it quickly thanks to the IQRF DALI Bridge.

MICRORISC s.r.o. introduces the IQRF DALI Bridge device for connecting your DALI lights to the IQRF wireless mesh network.

You can plug the IQRF DALI Bridge into your light with the DALI interface. Send DALI commands to control the lights (switching off, switching on, changing the intensity of lighting, etc.) via the IQRF wireless network. The IQRF is capable of connecting up to 239 lights into one network which can be then remotely controlled and monitored.

Using the IQRF to communicate with the lights enables you to use it as a backbone network for other devices such as AC units, heating, air quality etc.

Check www.wireless4lights.com where you can learn more about robust wireless connectivity for DALI devices and how to make obsolete light a smart light.

Make obsolete light a smart light with IQRF DALI bridge

Use the IQRF DALI bridge, which you simply plug into your light with the DALI interface.

Light control commands – switching off, switching on, changing the intensity of lighting, etc. – are then sent over the IQRF wireless network. This device allows communication with a DALI-enabled device over the IQRF wireless Mesh network.

Connecting to your light-supporting DALI standard is simple and requires no special and expensive development.

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Visit wireless4lights.com for more.

IQRF IDE 4.59 has useful features for lighting applications

IQRF DALI standard is supported in the Packet Inspector window so you can easily recognize individual returned values.

IQMESH Network Manager and AutoNetwork algorithm were improved and in Terminal / DPA Test / Data to send history you can find details of the selected packet.

Changes and enhancements:

  • IQRF OS 4.04D supported
  • DPA 4.15 supported
  • IQRF Standard DALI supported in the Packet Inspector window
  • IQMESH Network Manager / AutoNetwork algorithm improved
  • Terminal / DPA Test / Data to send history shows details of the selected packet
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Learn more about news in the IDE on www.iqrf.org.

IQRF Alliance presented at KKRRiT Multiconference

On Friday, September 18th, IQRF Alliance had a pleasure to participate and promote IQRF technology at the MULTICONFERENCE of the National Environment Tele- and Radiocommunication.

The MULTICONFERENCE is the most important conference for radio and telecommunication in Poland.

The representative of the IQRF Alliance presented the article “Implementation of wireless sensor network with the use of IQRF technology”. This article was created in cooperation with the Opole University of Technology that is one of members of the IQRF Alliance.

Abstract of the article:

“The subject of the article is a description of the use of the IQRF® platform to implement a wireless WSN network. IQRF® technology has enabled the construction of a sensor network with the possibility of reconfiguration. The theoretical part contains a description of the IQRF® hardware solutions used. The practical scope includes the description of the WSN network project implemented in building P3 of the Opole University of Technology. A wireless network consisting of 10 IQRF® modules was launched. The configured radio modules were placed in selected rooms on all five floors of the building for testing. Tests included measuring the transmission delay time of the measurement data package and the RSSI level.”

The article will be possibe to download soon after official relesed.

Authors: Ph.D eng. Sławomir PLUTA, eng. Patryk ROSZKOWSKI, MSC eng. Piotr ANTOŃCZYK

Permanent monitoring and elimination of pests with IQRF wireless traps by Adera

A new member of the IQRF Alliance introduced smart mouse traps with the IQRF wireless technology.

Adera is active in the field of pest control. At the time, COVID-19 even offered disinfection services to hotels and other public facilities.

Its portfolio includes interventions against flies, mosquitoes, wasps, hornets, rodents, ants, cockroaches, crickets, molds, woodpeckers and birds.

Adera helps other companies to comply with the prescribed hygiene obligations and protect their business. The possibility of non-stop surveillance and monitoring detects the presence of pests in the building before it causes serious damage. The new IQRF wireless mouse traps should help with this.

Check the first case study done by Adera.

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IQUBE IoT gateway by MICRORISC coming soon!

Do you need a powerful IQRF IoT gateway? MICRORISC, a member of the IQRF Alliance, is introducing its IQube.

The IQube is built on OrangePi Zero PC board running IQRF Daemon on Linux.

  • Orange Pi Zero H2 Quad Core Open Source 512MB Development Board
  • IQRF TR-76D extension board
  • White protective plastic box
  • Kingston 8GB SD card
  • Power supply 2A at 5V with micro USB connector
  • More details…

The IQube will be available in the mid-summer 2020!